Saturday, December 1, 2012

Elliptical Sentence





Ellipsis means leaving something out. Elliptical sentence is a shorter form of sentence which some words have been omitted, but it retains the same meaning. It is used so that we can avoid unnecessary repeated words.

It is noticeable that elliptical sentences are used quite common in some contexts as:

[1] In normal conversation

  •  A: Where are you going?  B: To school. (= I am going to school.)
  •  A: Ready? (= Are you ready?) B: Yes, I am. (= Yes, I am ready.)

[2] In comparison

  •  Phalla is taller than Phearom.
     (= Phalla is taller than Phearom is tall.)
  •  The ads attracted younger than older people.
     (= The ads attracted younger than  it attracted  older people.)

[3] In sentences joined by coordinating conjunctions

  •  I have washed and ironed my clothes.
     (= I have washed my clothes, and I have ironed my clothes.)
  •  Bora likes football, Phalla volleyball, and Sopheak basketball.
     (= Bora likes football, Phalla likes volleyball, and Sopheak likes basketball.)
  •  Kolab has five dollars, and Sopheak three.
     (= Kolab has five dollars, and Sopheak  has  three dollars.)

[4] In some dependent clauses


  •  If you clean the house today, i will tomorrow.
     (= If you clean the house today, i will clean the house tomorrow.)
  •  I will go to the party if you will.
     (= I will go to the party if you will go to the party.)

[5] In reduced clauses


  •  The song sung by Preap Sovath was so popular.
     (= The song which was sung by Preap Sovath was so popular. )
  •  The man selling the shoes is my friend.
     (= The man who is selling the shoes is my friend.)
  •  The police has found the car stolen yesterday.
     (= The police has found the car which was stolen yesterday.)
  •  When studying, he tried hard.
     (= When he was studying, he tried hard. )
  •  I visited the Bayon Temple after coming back from Battambang.
     (= I visited the Bayon Temple after I came back from Battambang. )
  •  Though a bit nervous, she presented the products to the doctor very well.
     (= Though she was a bit nervous, she presented the products to the doctor very well. )

[6] When used with "SO, TOO, EITHER, NEITHER"


  •  My sister is tall, and so do my brothers.
     (= My sister is tall, and my brothers are tall, too.)
  •  A : I was very sleepy last night.  B : So am I.
     (= A : I was very sleepy last night.  B : I am hungry, too.)
  •  My mom likes mangoes and my brother does too.
     (= My mom likes mangoes, and my brother likes mangoes, too.)
  •  He didn't say anything, and I didn't either.
     (= He didn't say anything, and I didn't say anything, too.)
  •  Her father likes to travel, and she does either.
     (= Her father likes to travel, and she likes to travel, too.)
  •  He didn't study hard, and neither did I.
     (= He didn't study hard, and I didn't study hard, too.)
  •  She doesn't review the lessons, and neither her friend.
     (= She doesn't review the lessons, and her friend didn't review the lessons, too.)

3 comments:

muhammad said...

Brothers, can you show the references about what you have written in this blog, so that we can confirm it whether it is true or not

Sam An said...

I am delighted to see your comment. You may find it here:
George Davison (2001). Phrases, Claues, and Sentences. 1st pub. P-172-174
:)

Leslie Lim said...

I read your blog.I thought it was great.. Hope you have a great day. God bless.

Camille
www.imarksweb.org